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Total Hip Replacement Surgery (THR)

Hip replacement surgery is a procedure in which the doctor removes the painful hip joint and replaces it with an artificial joint often made from plastic and metal components. Usually, it is done when all other treatment options have failed to provide pain relief to the patient.

Why is Hip replacement surgery done?

Some conditions can damage the hip joint and create the need for hip replacement surgery.

These are:

Osteoarthritis: It is commonly known as wear-and-tear arthritis. It damages the slick cartilage that covers the ends of bones and is helpful in moving the joints smoothly.

Rheumatoid arthritis: An overactive immune system causes rheumatoid arthritis. It produces a type of inflammation that can erode slick cartilage and occasionally underlying bone, resulting in deformed and damaged joints.

Osteonecrosis: If there is an inadequate blood supply to the ball portion of the hip joint, the bone may collapse and deform.

A hip replacement is considered if the patient is experiencing hip pain:

Despite the pain medication, the pain persists
Worsens with walking, even with a walker or cane
Interferes with your sleep
Affects your ability to climb stairs
Difficult to rise from a seated position
Tests and Diagnosis for Hip Replacement

A medical history and physical examination of the patient are done.

An X-ray is done to diagnose the characteristic features such as spurring of the joint margins and narrowing of the joint.

Hip Replacement Surgery Procedure

Hip replacement surgery can be performed traditionally or by using a minimally-invasive technique. The only difference between the two procedures is the size of the incision made to perform surgery.

During the Procedure

The hip replacement surgery procedure takes a few hours & is performed under general anaesthesia. In the surgery, a damaged bone and cartilage are removed and then new plastic, ceramic or metal implants are used to restore the alignment and function of the hip.

An incision is made along the side of the hip and muscles are moved to connect them to the top of the thigh bone that exposes the hip joint.
Then, the ball portion of the hip joint is removed by cutting the thigh bone with a saw.
After this, an artificial joint made with metal, plastic or ceramic is attached to the thigh bone using cement or any other special material that allows the remaining bone to attach to the new joint.
The surface of the hipbone is prepared by removing any damaged cartilage and the replacement socket part is attached to the hipbone.
The new ball is then inserted into the socket part of the hip. The doctor then reconnects the muscles and closes the incision.
Most of the hip replacement surgeries today are performed using the standard technique that includes one 8-10 inch cut along the side of the hip. In recent years, doctors are also using a minimally-invasive technique wherein doctor makes one to two cuts of 2 to 5 inches long.

However, both surgeries are performed with the same procedure.

The small cuts are thought to ease pain following surgery, lessen blood loss, shorter hospital stays, speed healing and reduce scar appearance.

After the Surgery

The patient is likely to stay in the hospital for 4-6 days and a wedge-shaped cushion will likely be placed between the legs of the patient to keep the new hip joint in place.
A drainage tube will likely be placed in the bladder for urination.
Physical therapy begins the day after surgery and within days, the patient can walk with a cane, walker or crutches.

How it works?

1.

Request for medicine

Patient who has serious problem request for medicine

 

2.

Drug Verify

Internal processing of drug verifications at GM Global

 

3.

Prescription

Recognizing best source for the specific prescription

 

4.

GDP Instruction

Import medicine under the GDP instruction

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

FAQ

A NPP provides access to post-approval drugs that are approved and commercially available in one or more country, other than the patient’s home country.

 

No. Companies are not required to provide their products through a formal NPP.

 

  • Dealing with unsolicited patient request for drug in an ethical and regulatory controlled manner
  • Providing exposure to, and experience with, company products to physicians in additional countries and build a larger KOL network and future advocates
  • Providing new products to patients who would move to commercial drug when it becomes available in these countries
  • Generating additional revenues in countries that allow you to charge for drugs supplied on a named patient basis

Companies can provide drug to patients in any country in which they have not yet received marketing approval. This includes countries in which a company plans to seek marketing approval, as well as those countries in which a company does not plan to seek marketing approval.

 
 

INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS

As a named patient medicines you may find yourself in the frightening position that you have a serious condition or illness and the treatment you need is not available in your home country. It is possible that the medicines are available outside your country and if your physician decides that these drugs would be suitable for the treatment of your illness, they then face the challenge of obtaining them for you. We help physicians across the world access medicines which are not approved or licensed in their country, but may be required to meet the special needs of an individual patient. The service we provide not only locates and supplies the required medicines but ensures that the physician has all the quality assurance and supporting clinical information they will need to safely prescribe it to you. If you are confronted with a situation where a drug is not available to you, talk to your physician or healthcare professional about Named Patient Program and ask them to contact us. We will then work directly with your physician to help them in patient access program and understand what options are available.

 

 

Drugs We Provide Under NPS

Drug Directory

Orphan Drugs

1.

Request for medicine

Patient who has serious problem request for medicine

 

2.

Drug Verify

Internal processing of drug verifications at GM Global

 

3.

Prescription

Recognizing best source for the specific prescription

 

4.

GDP Instruction

Import medicine under the GDP instruction

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

FAQ

A NPP provides access to post-approval drugs that are approved and commercially available in one or more country, other than the patient’s home country.

 

No. Companies are not required to provide their products through a formal NPP.

 

  • Dealing with unsolicited patient request for drug in an ethical and regulatory controlled manner
  • Providing exposure to, and experience with, company products to physicians in additional countries and build a larger KOL network and future advocates
  • Providing new products to patients who would move to commercial drug when it becomes available in these countries
  • Generating additional revenues in countries that allow you to charge for drugs supplied on a named patient basis

Companies can provide drug to patients in any country in which they have not yet received marketing approval. This includes countries in which a company plans to seek marketing approval, as well as those countries in which a company does not plan to seek marketing approval.

 
 

INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS

As a named patient medicines you may find yourself in the frightening position that you have a serious condition or illness and the treatment you need is not available in your home country. It is possible that the medicines are available outside your country and if your physician decides that these drugs would be suitable for the treatment of your illness, they then face the challenge of obtaining them for you. We help physicians across the world access medicines which are not approved or licensed in their country, but may be required to meet the special needs of an individual patient. The service we provide not only locates and supplies the required medicines but ensures that the physician has all the quality assurance and supporting clinical information they will need to safely prescribe it to you. If you are confronted with a situation where a drug is not available to you, talk to your physician or healthcare professional about Named Patient Program and ask them to contact us. We will then work directly with your physician to help them in patient access program and understand what options are available.