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Sclerotherapy for Vericose Veins treatment

“Sclerotherapy, which takes its name from a Greek word meaning “”hardening,”” is a method of treating enlarged veins by injecting an irritating chemical called a sclerosing agent into the vein. The chemical causes the vein to become inflamed, which leads to the formation of fibrous tissue and closing of the lumen, or central channel of the vein. Purpose Sclerotherapy in the legs is performed for several reasons. It is most often done to improve the appearance of the legs, and is accomplished by closing down spider veins—small veins in the legs that have dilated under increased venous blood pressure. A spider vein is one type of telangiectasia, which is the medical term for a reddish-colored lesion produced by the permanent enlargement of the capillaries and other small blood vessels. The word telangiectasia comes from three Greek words that mean “”end,”” “”blood vessel,”” and “”stretch out.”” In a spider vein, also called a “”sunburst varicosity”” there is a central reddish area that is visible to the eye because it lies close to the surface of the skin; smaller veins spread outward from it in the shape of a spider’s legs. Spider veins may also appear in two other common patterns—they may look like tiny tree branches or like extra-fine separate lines. In addition to the cosmetic purposes sclerotherapy serves, it is also performed to treat the soreness, aching, muscle fatigue, and leg cramps that often accompany small- or middle-sized varicose veins in the legs. It is not, however, used by itself to treat large varicose veins. Sclerotherapy as a general treatment modality is also performed to treat hemorrhoids (swollen veins) in the esophagus. Description Causes of spider veins To understand how sclerotherapy works, it is helpful to begin with a brief description of the venous system in the human body. The venous part of the circulatory system returns blood to the heart to be pumped to the lungs for oxygenation. This is in contrast to the arterial system, which carries oxygenated blood away from the heart to be distributed throughout the body. The smallest parts of the venous system are the capillaries, which feed into larger superficial veins. All superficial veins lie between the skin and a layer of fibrous connective tissue called fascia, which covers and supports the muscles and the internal organs. The deeper veins of the body lie within the muscle fascia. This distinction helps to explain why superficial veins can be treated by sclerotherapy without damage to the larger veins. Veins contain one-way valves that push blood inward and upward toward the heart when they are functioning normally. The blood pressure in the superficial veins is usually low, but if it rises and remains at a higher level over a period of time, the valves in the veins begin to fail and the veins dilate, or expand. Veins that are not functioning properly are said to be “”incompetent.”” As the veins expand, they become more noticeable because they lie closer to the surface of the skin, forming the typical patterns seen in spider veins. Some people are at greater risk for developing spider veins. These risk factors include: Sex. Females in any age group are more likely than males to develop spider veins. Genetic factors. Some people have veins with abnormally weak walls or valves. They may develop spider veins even without a rise in blood pressure in the superficial veins. Pregnancy. A woman’s total blood volume increases during pregnancy, which increases the blood pressure in the venous system. In addition, the hormonal changes of pregnancy cause the walls and valves in the veins to soften. Using birth control pills. Obesity. Excess body weight increases pressure on the veins. Occupational factors. People whose jobs require standing or sitting for long periods of time without the opportunity to walk or move around are more likely to develop spider veins than people whose jobs allow more movement. Trauma. Falls, deep bruises, cuts, or surgical incisions may lead to the formation of spider veins in or near the affected area. Sclerotherapy procedures In typical outpatient sclerotherapy treatment, the patient changes into a pair of shorts at the doctor’s office and lies on an examination table. After cleansing the skin surface with an antiseptic, the doctor injects a sclerosing agent into the veins. This agent is eliminated when the skin is stretched tightly over the area with the other hand. The doctor first injects the larger veins in each area of the leg, then the smaller ones. In most cases, one injection is needed for every inch of spider vein; a typical treatment session will require five to 40 separate injections. No anesthetic is needed for sclerotherapy, although the patient may feel a mild stinging or burning sensation at the injection site. The liquid sclerosing agents that are used most often to treat spider veins are polidocanol (aethoxysklerol), sodium tetradecyl sulfate, and saline solution at 11.7% concentration. Some practitioners prefer to use saline because it does not cause allergic reactions. The usual practice is to use the lowest concentration of the chemical that is still effective in closing the veins. A newer type of sclerosing agent is a foam instead of a liquid chemical that is injected into the veins. The foam has several advantages: It makes better contact with the wall of the vein than a liquid sclerosing agent; it allows the use of smaller amounts of chemical; and its movement in the vein can be monitored on an ultrasound screen. Sclerosing foam has been shown to have a high success rate with a lower cost, and causes fewer major complications. After all the veins in a specific area of the leg have been injected, the doctor covers the area with a cotton ball or pad and compression tape. The patient may be asked to wait in the office for 20–30 minutes after the first treatment session to ensure that there is no hypersensitivity to the sclerosing chemicals. Most sclerotherapy treatment sessions are short, lasting from 15 to 45 minutes. It is not unusual for patients to need a second treatment to completely eliminate the spider veins; however, it is necessary to wait four to six weeks between procedures.”

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A NPP provides access to post-approval drugs that are approved and commercially available in one or more country, other than the patient’s home country.

 

No. Companies are not required to provide their products through a formal NPP.

 

  • Dealing with unsolicited patient request for drug in an ethical and regulatory controlled manner
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Companies can provide drug to patients in any country in which they have not yet received marketing approval. This includes countries in which a company plans to seek marketing approval, as well as those countries in which a company does not plan to seek marketing approval.

 
 

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As a named patient medicines you may find yourself in the frightening position that you have a serious condition or illness and the treatment you need is not available in your home country. It is possible that the medicines are available outside your country and if your physician decides that these drugs would be suitable for the treatment of your illness, they then face the challenge of obtaining them for you. We help physicians across the world access medicines which are not approved or licensed in their country, but may be required to meet the special needs of an individual patient. The service we provide not only locates and supplies the required medicines but ensures that the physician has all the quality assurance and supporting clinical information they will need to safely prescribe it to you. If you are confronted with a situation where a drug is not available to you, talk to your physician or healthcare professional about Named Patient Program and ask them to contact us. We will then work directly with your physician to help them in patient access program and understand what options are available.

 

 

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1.

Request for medicine

Patient who has serious problem request for medicine

 

2.

Drug Verify

Internal processing of drug verifications at GM Global

 

3.

Prescription

Recognizing best source for the specific prescription

 

4.

GDP Instruction

Import medicine under the GDP instruction

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

FAQ

A NPP provides access to post-approval drugs that are approved and commercially available in one or more country, other than the patient’s home country.

 

No. Companies are not required to provide their products through a formal NPP.

 

  • Dealing with unsolicited patient request for drug in an ethical and regulatory controlled manner
  • Providing exposure to, and experience with, company products to physicians in additional countries and build a larger KOL network and future advocates
  • Providing new products to patients who would move to commercial drug when it becomes available in these countries
  • Generating additional revenues in countries that allow you to charge for drugs supplied on a named patient basis

Companies can provide drug to patients in any country in which they have not yet received marketing approval. This includes countries in which a company plans to seek marketing approval, as well as those countries in which a company does not plan to seek marketing approval.

 
 

INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS

As a named patient medicines you may find yourself in the frightening position that you have a serious condition or illness and the treatment you need is not available in your home country. It is possible that the medicines are available outside your country and if your physician decides that these drugs would be suitable for the treatment of your illness, they then face the challenge of obtaining them for you. We help physicians across the world access medicines which are not approved or licensed in their country, but may be required to meet the special needs of an individual patient. The service we provide not only locates and supplies the required medicines but ensures that the physician has all the quality assurance and supporting clinical information they will need to safely prescribe it to you. If you are confronted with a situation where a drug is not available to you, talk to your physician or healthcare professional about Named Patient Program and ask them to contact us. We will then work directly with your physician to help them in patient access program and understand what options are available.