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Mentoplasty for Chin Augmentation

“Mentoplasty is a term that refers to plastic surgery procedures for the chin. It comes from the Latin word mentum , which means chin, and the Greek verb plassein , which means “”to form”” or “”to shape.”” Mentoplasty is also known as genioplasty or chinplasty.

 

Purpose


Mentoplasty may be done for several reasons:


To correct malformations of the chin resulting from developmental abnormalities of the bones in the jaw. Sometimes the jawbones continue to grow on one side of the face but not the other, leading to facial asymmetry. In other instances a part of the jawbone is missing; this condition is known as congenital agenesis of the jaw.
To reshape a chin that is out of proportion to other facial features.
As part of gender reassignment surgery. The size and shape of the chin and lower jawline are somewhat different in men and women. Some people choose to have mentoplasty as part of their gender transition.
As part of craniofacial reconstruction following trauma or cancer surgery.
As part of orthognathic surgery. Orthognathic surgery involves repositioning the facial bones in order to correct deformities that affect the patient’s ability to speak or chew normally.

Description


Mentoplasties fall into two large categories: procedures that augment (increase) small or receding chins; and those that reduce large or protruding chins. Chin augmentation is done more frequently than chin reduction, reflecting the fact that microgenia (small chin) is the most common abnormality of the chin.

 

Chin augmentation


Chin augmentation can be performed by inserting an implant under the skin of the chin or by performing a sliding genioplasty. Insertion of an implant takes 30–60 minutes, while a sliding genioplasty takes slightly longer, 45–90 minutes. If the mentoplasty is done together with orthognathic surgery, the operation may take as long as three hours.


Chin implants are used in patients with mild or moderate microgenia. At one time they were made of cartilage taken from donors or from other sites on the patient’s body, but as of 2003 alloplastic implants (made from inert foreign materials) are used more often because they reduce the risk of infection. To insert the implant, the surgeon can choose to make the incision under the chin (submental) or inside the mouth (intraoral). In either case, the surgeon cuts through several layers of tissue, taking care to avoid damaging the major nerve in the chin. The surgeon makes a pocket in the connective tissue inside the chin and washes it out with an antiseptic solution. The sterile implant is then inserted in the pocket and positioned properly. The incision is closed and the wound covered with Steri-Strips.


A sliding genioplasty may be performed if the patient’s chin is too small for augmentation with an implant, or if the deformity is more complex. In this procedure, the surgeon cuts through the jawbone with an oscillating saw and removes part of the bone. He or she then moves the bone segment forward, holding it in place with metal plates and screws. After the bone segment has been fixed in place, the incision is closed and the patient’s head is wrapped with a pressure dressing.

 

Chin reduction

Reduction of an overly large or protruding chin may be done either by direct reduction or a sliding genioplasty. In a direct reduction, the surgeon makes either a submental or an intraoral incision and removes excess bone from the chin with a burr. A sliding genioplasty reduction is similar to a genioplasty to augment the chin, except that the bone segment is moved backward rather than forward.”

How it works?

1.

Request for medicine

Patient who has serious problem request for medicine

 

2.

Drug Verify

Internal processing of drug verifications at GM Global

 

3.

Prescription

Recognizing best source for the specific prescription

 

4.

GDP Instruction

Import medicine under the GDP instruction

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

FAQ

A NPP provides access to post-approval drugs that are approved and commercially available in one or more country, other than the patient’s home country.

 

No. Companies are not required to provide their products through a formal NPP.

 

  • Dealing with unsolicited patient request for drug in an ethical and regulatory controlled manner
  • Providing exposure to, and experience with, company products to physicians in additional countries and build a larger KOL network and future advocates
  • Providing new products to patients who would move to commercial drug when it becomes available in these countries
  • Generating additional revenues in countries that allow you to charge for drugs supplied on a named patient basis

Companies can provide drug to patients in any country in which they have not yet received marketing approval. This includes countries in which a company plans to seek marketing approval, as well as those countries in which a company does not plan to seek marketing approval.

 
 

INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS

As a named patient medicines you may find yourself in the frightening position that you have a serious condition or illness and the treatment you need is not available in your home country. It is possible that the medicines are available outside your country and if your physician decides that these drugs would be suitable for the treatment of your illness, they then face the challenge of obtaining them for you. We help physicians across the world access medicines which are not approved or licensed in their country, but may be required to meet the special needs of an individual patient. The service we provide not only locates and supplies the required medicines but ensures that the physician has all the quality assurance and supporting clinical information they will need to safely prescribe it to you. If you are confronted with a situation where a drug is not available to you, talk to your physician or healthcare professional about Named Patient Program and ask them to contact us. We will then work directly with your physician to help them in patient access program and understand what options are available.

 

 

Drugs We Provide Under NPS

Drug Directory

Orphan Drugs

1.

Request for medicine

Patient who has serious problem request for medicine

 

2.

Drug Verify

Internal processing of drug verifications at GM Global

 

3.

Prescription

Recognizing best source for the specific prescription

 

4.

GDP Instruction

Import medicine under the GDP instruction

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

FAQ

A NPP provides access to post-approval drugs that are approved and commercially available in one or more country, other than the patient’s home country.

 

No. Companies are not required to provide their products through a formal NPP.

 

  • Dealing with unsolicited patient request for drug in an ethical and regulatory controlled manner
  • Providing exposure to, and experience with, company products to physicians in additional countries and build a larger KOL network and future advocates
  • Providing new products to patients who would move to commercial drug when it becomes available in these countries
  • Generating additional revenues in countries that allow you to charge for drugs supplied on a named patient basis

Companies can provide drug to patients in any country in which they have not yet received marketing approval. This includes countries in which a company plans to seek marketing approval, as well as those countries in which a company does not plan to seek marketing approval.

 
 

INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS

As a named patient medicines you may find yourself in the frightening position that you have a serious condition or illness and the treatment you need is not available in your home country. It is possible that the medicines are available outside your country and if your physician decides that these drugs would be suitable for the treatment of your illness, they then face the challenge of obtaining them for you. We help physicians across the world access medicines which are not approved or licensed in their country, but may be required to meet the special needs of an individual patient. The service we provide not only locates and supplies the required medicines but ensures that the physician has all the quality assurance and supporting clinical information they will need to safely prescribe it to you. If you are confronted with a situation where a drug is not available to you, talk to your physician or healthcare professional about Named Patient Program and ask them to contact us. We will then work directly with your physician to help them in patient access program and understand what options are available.