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Lung Transplant

A Lung transplant is a surgical removing of a dysfunctional and diseased lung from the patient’s body and replaces it with a healthy lung from a donor.

Who Need a Lung Transplant?

Most people with severe and end-stage lung disease are considered for a lung transplant. The procedure is considered when someone seems likely to die without the surgery, and no other options are available. A person whose lung disease is so severe that they can no longer enjoy life can also be considered for a lung transplant. However, due to certain reasons people with age between 60 to 65 years are not considered for a lung transplant.

People with these lung diseases need to go for lung transplant:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (chronic bronchitis and emphysema)
Cystic fibrosis
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension
Lung transplant reasons may vary for all people with the above mentioned conditions. For example, in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scar tissue replaces healthy lung and in emphysema, lung tissue is destroyed by smoking.

Lung Transplant Procedure

Preparing for a Lung Transplant

The lung transplant evaluation process is usually complicated and long. Firstly, a doctor needs to refer a patient to a regional transplant center. At the transplant center, doctors, social workers, psychologists, and other staff meet with the person to gather information about him. These meetings may take place on several visits occurring over many weeks and months.

Besides the patient’s lung condition, the team also considers the person’s financial situation, family and social support, medical conditions or any other psychological conditions.

Many tests are performed during a lung transplant evaluation, which are:

Cardiac stress test
Pulmonary function tests
Bone mineral density test
Coronary artery catheterization
Chest X-ray
CT scan of the chest
Blood tests for kidney and liver function, and a complete blood count (CBC) and blood type
Tests for antibodies present in the blood
Doctors usually won’t recommend a lung transplant for patients with these conditions:

Significant heart, kidney or liver disease
Alcohol or drug abuse
Ongoing infections
Anyone who continues to smoke can’t be accepted for a lung transplant
Going on the Lung Transplant List

After tests and interviews have been completed and the patient is considered as a good candidate for a lung transplant, he/she will be listed on the national and regional organ recipient lists.

A person’s place on the list is determined by his/her Lung Allocation Score. This is a complicated calculation that tries to predict how long a patient can live without a lung transplant and how long he/she would be expected to live if they receive a lung transplant?

People with higher Lung Allocation Score are considered first when donors’ lungs become available.

During a Lung Transplant

When a compatible donor’s lungs become available, the patient will be called urgently to the transplant center to prepare for the surgery. Surgical team members travel to examine the deceased donor’s lungs to make sure they are suitable for transplant. If they find it suitable, surgery on the recipient begins immediately, when the lungs are in transit to the center.

The surgeon may perform either a single lung transplant or a double lung transplant. Each option has some advantages disadvantages, and the choice depends on the patient’s lung disease and other factors.

The surgeon will make an incision in the chest. The incision varies by the type of lung transplant:

An incision on one side of the chest (for a single lung transplant)
An incision on either side of the chest or across the entire width of the front of the chest (for a double lung transplant)
This surgery is performed under general anesthesia.

Some patients receiving a lung transplant need to go on cardiopulmonary bypass during the surgery. During this bypass, the blood is pumped and enriched with oxygen by a machine, rather than by the heart and lungs.

After a Lung Transplant

The full recovery time after a lung transplant varies widely between people. Some people are fine to leave the hospital within a week, or some may need to be in the hospital for two weeks or longer.

The receiver needs to follow these points for the timely recovery:

Frequent follow-ups with the doctor
Follow a new lifelong medication plan
Regular physical therapy and rehabilitation exercises
Regular blood tests, chest X-rays, lung function tests, and procedures like bronchoscopy
Recovery

The patient is advised to do regular exercises in order to build up their strength.
After the surgery, for the initial six weeks receiver should avoid pulling, pushing, or lifting anything heavy.
Four to six weeks after the transplant, the patient will be able to drive.
Immunosuppressant

After a lung transplant, the patient needs to take immunosuppressant for the rest of his life. This is because there is a risk that the body can identify the new lung as a foreign organ, and the patients’ immune system can attack it. This is known as rejection syndrome.

Prognosis of lung transplant

Lung transplant is a major surgery that is being performed for people suffering from life-threatening lung disease. After complete recovery from lung transplantation, most of the people do not have any restriction in physical activities. Up to people surviving for five years or more, half of them work at least part-time. Age at the time of transplant is the most important factor for the survival of the transplant.

How it works?

1.

Request for medicine

Patient who has serious problem request for medicine

 

2.

Drug Verify

Internal processing of drug verifications at GM Global

 

3.

Prescription

Recognizing best source for the specific prescription

 

4.

GDP Instruction

Import medicine under the GDP instruction

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

FAQ

A NPP provides access to post-approval drugs that are approved and commercially available in one or more country, other than the patient’s home country.

 

No. Companies are not required to provide their products through a formal NPP.

 

  • Dealing with unsolicited patient request for drug in an ethical and regulatory controlled manner
  • Providing exposure to, and experience with, company products to physicians in additional countries and build a larger KOL network and future advocates
  • Providing new products to patients who would move to commercial drug when it becomes available in these countries
  • Generating additional revenues in countries that allow you to charge for drugs supplied on a named patient basis

Companies can provide drug to patients in any country in which they have not yet received marketing approval. This includes countries in which a company plans to seek marketing approval, as well as those countries in which a company does not plan to seek marketing approval.

 
 

INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS

As a named patient medicines you may find yourself in the frightening position that you have a serious condition or illness and the treatment you need is not available in your home country. It is possible that the medicines are available outside your country and if your physician decides that these drugs would be suitable for the treatment of your illness, they then face the challenge of obtaining them for you. We help physicians across the world access medicines which are not approved or licensed in their country, but may be required to meet the special needs of an individual patient. The service we provide not only locates and supplies the required medicines but ensures that the physician has all the quality assurance and supporting clinical information they will need to safely prescribe it to you. If you are confronted with a situation where a drug is not available to you, talk to your physician or healthcare professional about Named Patient Program and ask them to contact us. We will then work directly with your physician to help them in patient access program and understand what options are available.

 

 

Drugs We Provide Under NPS

Drug Directory

Orphan Drugs

1.

Request for medicine

Patient who has serious problem request for medicine

 

2.

Drug Verify

Internal processing of drug verifications at GM Global

 

3.

Prescription

Recognizing best source for the specific prescription

 

4.

GDP Instruction

Import medicine under the GDP instruction

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

5.

QA check

Supply drugs to concerned healthcare provider after QA check

 

FAQ

A NPP provides access to post-approval drugs that are approved and commercially available in one or more country, other than the patient’s home country.

 

No. Companies are not required to provide their products through a formal NPP.

 

  • Dealing with unsolicited patient request for drug in an ethical and regulatory controlled manner
  • Providing exposure to, and experience with, company products to physicians in additional countries and build a larger KOL network and future advocates
  • Providing new products to patients who would move to commercial drug when it becomes available in these countries
  • Generating additional revenues in countries that allow you to charge for drugs supplied on a named patient basis

Companies can provide drug to patients in any country in which they have not yet received marketing approval. This includes countries in which a company plans to seek marketing approval, as well as those countries in which a company does not plan to seek marketing approval.

 
 

INFORMATION FOR PATIENTS

As a named patient medicines you may find yourself in the frightening position that you have a serious condition or illness and the treatment you need is not available in your home country. It is possible that the medicines are available outside your country and if your physician decides that these drugs would be suitable for the treatment of your illness, they then face the challenge of obtaining them for you. We help physicians across the world access medicines which are not approved or licensed in their country, but may be required to meet the special needs of an individual patient. The service we provide not only locates and supplies the required medicines but ensures that the physician has all the quality assurance and supporting clinical information they will need to safely prescribe it to you. If you are confronted with a situation where a drug is not available to you, talk to your physician or healthcare professional about Named Patient Program and ask them to contact us. We will then work directly with your physician to help them in patient access program and understand what options are available.